Treating Ocular Rosacea

Written by on March 22, 2006 in Ocular Rosacea with 83 Comments
thera-tears-sterilid

A brief but quite well written article about Treating Ocular Rosacea from the American Academy of Ophthamology’s EyeNet Magazine online. This paper gives the high level approach of how to get ocular rosacea under control.

How to Treat Ocular Rosacea, Roger M. Kaldawy, MD, John E. Sutphin, MD, And Michael D. Wagoner, MD. Edited By Sharon Fekrat, MD, And Ingrid U. Scott, MD, MPH

Pathophysiology

Tear film disturbances are responsible for the vast majority of subjective complaints and objective findings in ocular rosacea. The reduced amount and altered character of meibomian gland secretions result in destabilization of the lipid portion of the tear film and increased tear evaporation rates. More than one-third of patients with rosacea also have impaired aqueous tear secretion, further contributing to ocular surface desiccation.

The most serious complications of ocular rosacea probably result from reactions of the sclera, limbus and cornea to staphylococcal endotoxins or cell-mediated hypersensitivity responses to staphylococcal antigens. The variability in response of patients with ocular rosacea to these immune reactions may account for the extreme variability in clinical signs and symptoms associated with this disorder.

….

Drug Treatment

Tetracycline derivatives are the mainstay of therapy for ocular rosacea. Our standard regimen is to start with 100 milligrams of doxycycline orally twice a day for one month, after which it is used once daily for at least two more months.

Therapeutic response. Patients are advised that there will be a delayed therapeutic response of several weeks. At three months, the medication is adjusted according to the therapeutic response: For marked improvement, the medication can be tapered to 100 mg every other day for the next three months. For mild to moderate improvement, 100 mg is continued on a daily basis. After six months, patients may go on “doxycycline vacations” for two to three months. Eventually symptoms will recur in most cases, and periodic reinstitution of low maintenance doses is necessary.

….

Three-Step Approach

Tetracycline derivatives are most effective when used in conjunction with the following three-step approach:

  1. Normalize tear film disturbance.
    • Warm compresses. These help further minimize meibomian gland obstruction and improve lipid flow into the tear film.
    • Punctal occlusion. Temporary or permanent occlusion is useful if aqueous tear production is deficient.
    • Artificial tear substitutes. These are useful until ocular surface wetting, punctate epitheliopathy and variable vision during prolonged visual tasks have improved.
  2. Control bacterial overgrowth.
    • Lid hygiene. This is part of a long-term maintenance program to minimize meibomian gland obstruction, improve lipid flow into the tear film and control bacterial overgrowth.
    • Topical antibiotics. These are useful in the first month of treatment to reduce bacterial flora. Generally, they should be used when acute mucopurulent blepharoconjunctivitis, marginal corneal infiltrates or peripheral ulcerative keratitis are present.
  3. Control inflammatory and hypersensitivity reactions.
    • Topical corticosteroids. These are useful in the first month of treatment to reduce ocular surface inflammation. Generally, they should be used if marginal corneal infiltrates, peripheral ulcerative keratitis without progressive thinning and/or vascularization are present.
    • Topical progestational steroids. Compounded medroxyprogesterone 1 percent may be used if peripheral ulcerative keratitis with progressive thinning is present.

In addition, topical progestational steroids are useful in conjunction with corticosteroids for treating progressive vascularization.

Featured Product


Related Articles

Read more about: Ocular Rosacea

About the Author

About the Author: David Pascoe started the Rosacea Support Group in October 1998. .

Follow Rosacea Support

Subscribe via RSS Feed

83 Reader Comments

  1. Maria Santana says:

    Greetings: I have been taking 100 mg of doxcycline for over 2 months now for ocular rosacea, however, I am having terrible heartburn because of it & this eye infection seems to be extremely persistent. My doctor recommends that I continue taking doxcycline for another 3 months. AARRGGG…There has to be a better way….

  2. Rose Marie says:

    I just read this and am now going through the same
    thing. I have been on and off of the doxy and now the
    doctor switched me to flagl? What result did you have
    finally??
    ROse

  3. Hi Maria and Rose,

    perhaps it might be worthwhile asking your doctor if a low dose doxycycline, say Oracea or generic doxycycline 50mg a day is an alternative. This dose is much less likely to cause a reaction, and should still give a good benefit if you continue for a few months.

    davidp.

  4. Lauren says:

    I’ve been taking 200 mg Doxy daily (100 mg twice a day) for occular Rosacea and Rosacea pimples (I’m using laser for redness and flushing). It’s been a week so far, so I’m not expecting results yet. If you’ve had good results with antibiotics on any Rosacea symptoms, please email me at lapuskas@yahoo.com. Thanks.

  5. Hi Lauren, you will need around 4-6 weeks on doxy to see the full benefit of taking it.

  6. Carl Cavallaro says:

    Thank you so much for your information. My brother, Daymon has had an inherited eye desease, lattice dystrophy. The doctor has been treating him for a transplant rejection, an infection but at the most recent visit he thinks he may have rosacea. He seems to be really in trouble with his eye situation. Any helpful information would be much appreciated.

  7. Hi Carl,

    Sorry but I have no idea bout lattice dystrophy. I don’t recall it ever coming up on any of the rosacea boards and I couldn’t find anything by doing a search. We wish you all the best.

    davidp.

  8. Rhonda O says:

    i have recently been diagnosed with lattice dystrophy, and I have suffered from ocular roscea for years. I have always believed that there was a connection. I have used baby shampoo and tea tree shampoo for treatment. I have had periodic relief from the roscea using these products. Any comments?

  9. Norman says:

    I need to locate a specialist the treats Ocular Rosacea. We live in San Francisco, CA but will travel to find the BEST Doctor. Can you recommend a Doctor?

    Your help is much appriciated,

    Norman

  10. Hi Norman,

    I think the idea of a best doctor may well be one of those concepts that are hard to pin down and may even consume and waste time – most especially because best will be a personal perception.

    I haven’t sought out a doctor for ocular rosacea myself but I do know of a couple of doctors that have been very helpful to the online rosacea community.

    Dr. Eric Jones, MD from the Devers Eye Institute in Portland, Oregon gave us a nice interview here: Ocular Rosacea: Dr. Eric Jones, MD as well as Ocular Rosacea: Dr. Mark J. Mannis, MD.

    Dr. Mannis is an experienced Opthamologist Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Science at the University of California, Davis – closer to you. I don’t know if he still se patients, but that might be worth investigating also.

    You might also find some helpful people hanging out in the Ocular Rosacea Community forum.

    Hope this helps,
    davidp.

  11. Terry Matthews says:

    Hi David,

    I have had rosacea for several years, under control now, thank goodness, but I now realize from reading on this website (many thanks!) that my eye problems are ocular rosacea! However, as a sufferer rather than a medical practitioner, I am having a great deal of trouble understanding the terminology.
    Could you please translate the above “Treating Occular Rosacea”. I have a medical dictionary in one hand and Google up on another tab. Still cannot find “punctate epitheliopathy” or “punctal occlusion” or “mucopurulent blepharoconjunctivitis”. Give me a break! I need to know what these are and what I can do about them or if I even have them!
    I do understand about warm compresses and artificial tears and can start with those immediately to help alieviate some symptoms.
    Thanks for all the help and the realization that I am not alone in this.

    Terry

  12. Hi Terry,

    OK I’m no Opthamologist, you might have a better chance with your text books, but let me have a try.

    Punctal Occlusion

    This is the easy one. The punctual plugs are where the tears drain out of the eye – in the corners of the eye towards the nose. If the eyes are not wet enough from your own tears, a doctor may put a plug into the `drain’ to slow the exit of tears.

    Punctate Epitheliopathy

    An epithelium is the covering of the eye, so this sounds like a disease of the epithelium seen as small holes or elevations on the surface.

    Mucopurulent Blepharoconjunctivitis

    At a guess I’d say a form of blepharitis/conjuctivits where mucus and pus are present. The conjuctiva is of course one of the protective layers of the eye. Blepharitis is inflamation of the eyelid margins. So it sounds like a condition where the eyelid and eye surface is involved and pus/mucus is being produced.

    I’d be happy for corrections !

  13. Susan says:

    Please, please, particularly if you are a physician, go to demodexsolutions.com then click on about demodex in the green box on the left. If you read the information , you will find there are ways to prove the existance of the mites by a simple test. Pay close attention to the associative diseases section.

    I have been diagnoised with Morgellons disease and have been searching the internet for two years. I believe this is the connection.

  14. MARK says:

    I AM 49 AND SUFFERED SINCE I WAS 14 WITH EYE REDNESS, BLOODSHOT AND DRY. I WAS UNDER AN OPTOMOLOGIST CARE SINCE I WAS 17. I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT I HAD AN NO DOCTOR GAVE ME A SPECIFIC DIAGNOSIS UNTIL LAST YEAR. I WAS TREATED FOR BLEPHARITIS, CONJUNTIVITIS, DRY EYE AND ALLERGIES. I WAS GIVEN TOPICAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES, STEROIDS AND ANTIBIOTICS. I WAS GIVEN ARTIFICIAL TEARS, EYE WASHES AND CLEANSERS. SOME BROUGHT MARGINAL RELIEF AND OTHERS DID NOTHING. I WAS ON A STEROID DROP FOR OVER 15 YEARS AND WAS LUCKY ENOUGH NOT DEVELOPE CATARACTS OR GLAUCOMA BECAUSE OF THE LENGTH OF MY STEROID USE.
    I HAVE SUFFERED EMOTIONALLY BECAUSE OF THIS WITH PEOPLE THINKING I WAS A DRUGGIE, ALCOHOLIC OR BOTH. I WAS INSECURE AND STILL AM ABOUT IT. THE WORST THING ABOUT ALL OF THIS IS THAT I HAVE BIG EYES SO IT MAKES IT MORE VISIBLE. IF I HAD BEADIE EYES I MAY HAVE BEEN ABLE TO HIDE IT A LITTLE BETTER.
    ANYWAY, I SOMEHOW SURVIVED IT ALL AND MANAGED TO ALWAYS BE SOCIALLY ACTIVE BUT IT WASN’T EASY. I DID LET IT GET TO ME AT TIMES AND OTHER TIMES I WOULD JUST SAY HELL WITH IT AND IF YOU HAD SOMETHING TO SAY I WOULD JUST LET YOU HAVE IT.
    IT IS NOT AN EASY THING TO LIVE WITH AND I NO HOW DEPRESSING IT CAN BE TO DEAL WITH IT AND THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS.
    DON’T LET IT DESTROY YOUR HAPPINESS. THE BEST WAY TO DEAL IS TO LET PEOPLE KNOW WHAT YOU HAVE WHEN THEY MAKE A COMMENT TO YOU. MOST OF THE TIME THEY WON’T BUT YOU CAN FEEL THEM STARING AT YOU.
    IT HAS ONLY BEEN RECENTLY I MET A DOCTOR WHO DIAGNOSED IT CORRECTLY. I TAKE RESTASIS TWICE A DAY, ARTIFICIAL TEARS TWICE A DAY AND A DISOLVING TABLET I PLACE IN MY EYE TWICE A DAY CALLED LUCIVERT. I ALSO HAVE PLUGS TO CONTROL MY TEAR DRAINAGE.
    ALL I CAN SAY IS A GOOD PERSONALITY WILL GET YOU THROUGH. I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN THE JOKER AND LIFE OF THE PARTY AND THAT HAS HELPED ME SURVIVE.
    IF ANYONE NEEDS SOMEONE TO TALK TO ABOUT THIS CONTACT ME ANYTIME AT MY EMAIL.
    BRONXBOYMARK@AOL.COM

  15. catherine says:

    My husband has this eye problem for about 4 years. He has been to eye specialists who said that his eyes were oily and has recomended blepharitis gel for cleaning the eyelids and we have also tried warm compress. One of hte eye specialists recommended retasis which my husband has tried but only for a month and give up as there is not much improvement. He told me his eyes felt gelly and he has oily face. I will cleanse his eyelids with the blepharel gel thrice a day but still not much improvemnt. Glad to hear from your experience about what treatment you have. Thanks and look forward to receiving a response from you.

  16. Comment via email:

    “hi catherine:

    i can only tell you that there are occasionally days where they feel and look better. i have had this for my entire life and have learned to live with it. washing my eyelids helps a little but it is a frustrating thing. people don’t understand that it is not only a cosmetic thing but a physical pita.lol. my eyes feel like there is sand in them, they hurt, they itch and they strain easily. other than that, it’s great! lol. you kind of get use to the redness and bloodshot eyes but you feel very insecure and self-conscious. the thing is drug companies have come up with drugs to grow eyelashes, tighten skin and improve your love life but nobody seems to be doing anything for this serious and uncomfortable ailment. I never realized there were so many millions of people suffering with rosacea. I don’t and never has rosacea on my skin but have had eye rosacea for 35 years. Go figure.\Well tell your husband to keep the faith. Eye refeshing tear drops help as do eye compresses.
    write me anytime.

    Mark”

  17. Jim says:

    I believe this is all related to H Pylori.
    I too have rosacea and chalazian of the eye,
    Do any of you guys also suffer heartburn, bloating etc.
    I DO NOT believe Doctors know what they are doing,
    I do believe that we are all chemically inbalanced and the toxins from H Pylori are released through our skin and or eyes, And our only cure will be treating The H Pylori.

  18. Denise says:

    Wow! I am so happy to find this site. I have had rosacea for years and used creams and oral antibiotics. More than 2 years ago I experienced eye pain and redness for the first time. That has resulted in many MD appointments and different diagnosis and treatments to no avail. I do the eye scrubs, eye lubricant drops, ointments, oral antibiotics, eye drops with antibiotics and steroids, and for the last six week restasis. The restasis seems to be more irritating than helpful. I have discontinued the restasis as of today. The redness I can live with but the pain and decreased vision acuity is trying! It’s nice to hear that I’m not alone! Kind of misery loves company! If anyone has any new ideas I’d love to hear them.

  19. Adriana L. says:

    I am very glad to find so much information about rosacea.
    I’ve been dealing with this conditions for years now and it’s not easy.
    When I was first diagnosed with rosacea I knew nothing about ocular rosacea. Being contact lenses user, my eyes were frequently red, irritated and dry.
    Where I live there is no ocular rosacea especialist, so I’m not sure yet if I have the rosacea on the eye too or if it’s just about the face.
    But the fact is, I can’t use the lenses anymore due to the discomfort they cause.
    Since my glasses are really thick one ophtamologist told me I should have miopia surgery.
    My qyestion is: is it dangerous, in case I do have the ocular rosacea?
    Is it possibly that, if I have the rosacea just on the face, it could spread to the eye during the healing of the surgery and I end up really worse?
    I do need help with these questions!
    Any ideas will be welcome!
    Thanks!

  20. Sheralyn says:

    I had Lasik just over 4 years ago and it’s ruined my life due to the severe dry eye it’s caused… Prior to LASIK I was able to spend hours reading, using the computer, being outside on windy days etc with zero eye discomfort . The only clues that my eyes might be in trouble were that they could not tolerate contact lenses (would become very dry), and every morning when I woke up they would be very dry until I put a drop of Patanol in…

    Post LASIK, my eyes are always red, can’t tolerate much time on the computer, eyes burn when reading, and I wear goggles almost 24/7 to minimize eye redness/burning/dryness etc

    I also have rosacea on my face… not sure if I had mild ocular involvement pre- LASIK or not… but whatever problems I had before, Lasik just increased it big- time…

  21. Tara says:

    I was recently diagnosed with ocular rosasea. I am having a tough time finding cosmetics I can use around my eyes, mainly eyeshadow, liner and mascara. Does anyone have any suggestions? Brands, specific products? The only mascara that is ok to use but have to remove it right when i get home is from origins.

    Suggestions?
    Tara

  22. Lori says:

    I’ve had rosacea on my face for years and my eyes have always been very sensitive, could never wear contacts, I’ve tried many times over the years, make-up irrates them and light sensitivity. All the eye Drs. I’ve seen over the years have blamed it on my light colored eyes, they’re green. Finally today I went to see an ophthamologist who diagnosed it as ocular rosacea. So now I will try the artifical tears, eye scrubs and warm compresses. I’ve been taking 100 mg. doxycycline every day for years. I did ask her about make-up and she said try either Almay or Nuetragena mascara. Almay was the only brand I had been able to use and now I’m sensitive to that so I’ll try Nuetragena.

  23. Derek says:

    I looked over a number of the posts here, but it seems no one has my symptoms, exactly, nor the same treatment.

    Basically, every now and then I get a sore right eye, as if I’ve just not gotten enough sleep or stared at a screen too long. It’s always JUST the right eye. If I get exposed to ANY sunlight glare during this time, I get a VICIOUS reaction a few hours later. Even without glare, that night I still get a not much milder version of it. The effects are burning and tearing in my right eye, as if I have some foreign object in there. I have real trouble sleeping with that, as you might imagine. Being awake and able to blink helps, though it’s still miserable.

    The treatments here with tetracycline or doxicycline wouldn’t help, since I need IMMEDIATE relief. What works for me is as soon as I start getting symptoms to start taking four drops a day of Vigamox (antibiotic) and two drops a day of Flarex (steroid, enhances the Vigamox effect). The misery usually goes away within six hours or so, if I catch it early enough, or a day or so if I wait till I’m in pain.

    I take the drops for 5-7 days. I scrub my eyelids diligently, since I did have blepharitis as a result of this condition initially, but it’s no longer a problem. Maybe I have dry-eye, but I’m not usually aware of any dryness issues.

    But half the time the symptoms return within a couple weeks and I have to start the treatment all over again. Other times the treatment works fine and I have no recurrence for close to a year.

    But the goddamn symptoms keep coming back. Sucks being biological, doesn’t it?

    My email address is ooo0001@aol.com, if anyone has any questions or suggestions.

  24. Hi Derek,

    I’m hoping that if you are using steroid and antibiotic drops regularly then you are under the continuing care of an ophthalmologist ? It sounds like you have something that needs an expert to help you with.

    all the best with breaking through your symptoms,
    davidp.

  25. Derek says:

    Yes, David, I can’t get the Vigamox without a prescription. Unfortunately, for years they’ve given me the same diagnosis, yet they insist on checking me anyway, something not easy for me to afford and which doesn’t appear to make a difference.

    I’m just frustrated that they can only shrug and throw antibiotics at it, without coming up with a method I can use to prevent it from returning.

    I did recently read that spicy foods can cause a flareup, and I’ve noticed that symptoms usually hit on Friday nights…which is the one night a week I go out and often eat–you guessed it–spicy foods. Hmmm….

    Give up chicken makini and veg koorma? Ack!

  26. Erin says:

    Try using Oil of Oregano instead of Antibiotics. Get the strong stuff and take it every day. This does the same thing the antibiotics do and is healthier for your system. May take slightly longer to take effect but it has helped me.

    Also drink plenty of water and take Udo’s Oil, essential fatty acids every morning along with probiotics and greens.

  27. Derek says:

    Oil of oregano. Hmm, I’ll look into it. Thanks!

  28. Minnesota says:

    To Bronx Boy Mark:

    Great post. Inspirational!

    Are you getting by OK on your regimine?

    Thanks,
    Minnesota

  29. Derek says:

    I just discovered something that works remarkably well. Whenever I feel any discomfort in my eye, like tiredness or dryness, I just put in a drop of Theratears. That’s all it takes, apparently, to keep the flareup at bay. I suspect dry eye was perhaps making the environment suitable for a bacterial infection, and Theratears prevents it from going that far.

    Man, had I known that years ago I could have probably saved a few thousand dollars on doctor visits and meds….

  30. For several years I have had red irratated eyes.Finally diagnosed with ocular rosacea,my Dr. put me on 100 mg.of doxicycline.I would wash my face several times a day but my eyes still felt gritty and were always red.I finally went to my favorite health food store and they reccommened soverein Silver drops.My eyes have calmed down an have not felt this good in a long time.I put a drop in my eyes every couple of hours or when I think about it. I even put them in wearing my contacts. I hope this helps some of you it certainly has helped me.

  31. Hello Ellen,

    Did the health food store or any of the literature you got say anything about using Colloidal Silver in your eyes ? Just wondering as it sounds like something that should be used with caution.

    I did find this page that suggested that the makers are only suggesting you use it as a dietary supplement.

    http://www.natural-immunogenics.com/faq_detail.php?FAQID=11

    Can I use Sovereign Silver™ as eye drops or for sores on my skin?

    Prior to 1999, colloidal silver products were allowed to be sold and labeled ‘over-the-counter’ for many common health concerns, both external and internal. Today, we market and label Sovereign Silver™ to be used exclusively for ingestion as a dietary supplement, as regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health Educational Act (DSHEA) of 1994.

    davidp.

  32. Jennifer says:

    I have ocular rosacea, and have seen 3 opthamologists in the past 5 years. My eyes are always red. The specialists say my eyes are not too dry, but rather are inflamed due to the rosacea. I have tried doxcycline for 4 months but did not respond to that therapy. I also tried restasis for 6 months and did not respond to that. I also take fish oil (omega 3) every day. Does anyone know of other, safe antiobotic therapies to help control the inflamation associated with ocular rosacea?

  33. Derek says:

    Jennifer, I have found that Theratears is useful when my eyes get a little scratchy or uncomfortable to ward off worsening rosacea symptoms, but if they do hit, a single drop of Flarex works great. But when none of that works, Vigamox 4x per day for 5-7 days does the trick.

    Derek

  34. Tanya says:

    Karen-
    I am an ophthalmic techinician and have worked in ophthalmology for 6.5 years. I currently work with a corneal specialist who specializes in external diseases of the eye. When it comes to ocular rosacea, it can be very difficult to treat. Two of the most important things you can do is warm compresses and lid scubs. In order for the warm compresses to be truly affective, you need to keep continuous moist heat on your eyes for FIFTEEN minutes. Your best bet is to use two wet washcloths and heat them in the microwave for 5-10 seconds. Once one cloth starts to cool, heat the second one and continue alternating them until you get fifteen minutes of moist heat. Immediately after that, use an Ocusoft lid scrub pad. Many people recommend baby shampoo but it is not developed for the eyes and can often irritate the eyes more than help. These are available over the counter at any major drugstore. In terms of drops, there is an antibiotic out on the market called Azasite, which is an azithromycin drop. It is like doxycycline for the eye and works well for ocular rosacea. The typical course is to go through two bottles and what is really nice about this drop is that it stays in the cells of eye for six weeks after discontinuing use. Restasis is good because it retrains the lacrimal glands to stop producing inflammatory cells caused by ocular rosacea and produce healthy tear cells. The downside is that it takes 6-8 weeks to work therefore it really works best when it is used with a mild steroid drop for four weeks and taper off of. These need to be started at the same time. Doxycycline is good, but you don’t mention the dosage. For severe cases, you can use 100 mg twice a day with food. There is also Oracea, which you would need to get a script from a dermatologist. I know this disease is frustrating and there is no instant fix or a cure. I hope this helps with your frustrations.

  35. Jennifer says:

    Tanya,
    I read your post (#34). I have ocular rosacea. I did not respond to doxcycline (100mg twice a day), so my opthamologist recently prescribed oral azithromycin (500mg twice a week). I am also using erythromycin ophthalmic ointment every other night. Have you any thoughts or experience with this therapy regeime?
    I have been using a dry heat compresses on my eyes each night–do you believe the moist heat is more effective than the dry heat?
    Thanks for your feedback and advice.
    Jennifer

  36. Thanks so much for your very helpful comments Tanya.

  37. Rob says:

    hi im 14 and since i can remember my eyes have been becoming more red and more swollen. they are now really bad. my eye lid ends have become a dark shade of red and are sore. i also have hardly any eyelashes. i get really bad gunk and crust around my eyes and thick on my eyelids. my eye lids also feel like theres cracks or crevasis in them vertically. my eyes push out of their sockets now and my vision is blurred. my skin is flaky and i hae really bad dandruff(flaky scalp)as you can imagine the word alien is thrown around alot at school.i have read steroids will make me go blind and am worried if i go to the docters and my parents wouldnt believe me if i told them ocular rosacia is a real condition. its getting worse and worse and im getting worried. any advice please send me a email roaderob@googlemail.com

  38. Nazareth says:

    I have been living with rosacea for many years now and have always been able to keep it under control. I recently started to break out with what was diagnosed as “allergic reactions” in my eyes. I was prescribed fungal cream as well as steroid creams with no success. After reading and visiting this site frequently, I realized that what I have is ocular rosacea. The problem with this is that my doctors don’t know or have no experienced this before. I have no other options as we are military and in Japan where I have no other options but to see our military doctors. The problem I really want to solve is how to keep my eye lids moisturized. I cannot use the same moisturizer as I use on my face as it burns my eye lids and leaves them very swollen and dry. My eyes look horrible and there’s not much I can do about it except let them be. I have started the baby shampoo cleanse every night and am also doing warm compresses.
    Does anyone have any suggstions on what I can use to keep my eye lids moistuized without bringing a reaction on to them?? I’ve heard jojoba oil…anyone ever try that? Any suggestions are very much appreciated.

  39. An email I have copied from Message 109299

    Hi Dot,

    I take regular low dose doxycycline 20mg twice a day and it works beautifully as an alternative for Oracea and it is covered. I have Ocular rosacea too and between the doxy and 5 fish oil caps a day i have my eyes almost back to normal and I wear contacts everyday.

    Sunny

  40. Rjj says:

    Bronxboymark….awesome comments!

    Also, anyone care to list the brand names of fishoil that work for you.

    Also, does anyone have any experience with flax seed oil?

    Thanks,
    Rjj

Leave your comment here

 

 

Top

Subscribe to Rosacea News

Enter your email address to receive the latest news about rosacea in your inbox.