sea buckthorn oil and atopic dermatitis

Written by on July 11, 2006 in dermatitis, Natural Treatments with 1 Comment

Effect of dietary supplementation with sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed and pulp oils on the fatty acid composition of skin glycerophospholipids of patients with atopic dermatitis.

Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 2000 Jun;11(6):338-40. Baoru Yang, Kirsti O. Kalimo, Raija L. Tahvonen, Leena M. Mattila, Jouko K. Katajisto and Heikki P. Kallio.

Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed and pulp oils have traditionally been used for treating skin diseases in China and Russia, but are not widely used in other countries. A placebo-controlled, parallel study was carried out to investigate the effects of these oils on the fatty acid composition of skin glycerophospholipids of patients with atopic dermatitis. Sixteen patients ate 5 g of sea buckthorn seed oil, pulp oil, or paraffin oil daily for 4 months. Skin fatty acids were analyzed with gas chromatography before and after treatment. The seed oil slightly increased the proportion of docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) and decreased the proportion of palmitic acid (16:0) in skin glycerophospholipids (0.05 < P < 0.1). The levels of the other fatty acids remained stable. The results show that the fatty acid composition of skin glycerophospholipids is well buffered against short-term dietary modification.

Author Keywords: atopic dermatitis; Hippophaë rhamnoides; skin fatty acids; sea buckthorn oils


A similar article is available online via the International Center for Research & Training on Seabuckthorn site. Some extracts are below.Full Article: Effect of dietary supplementation with sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed and pulp oils on the fatty acid composition of skin glycerophospholipids of patients with atopic dermatitis (PDF).

Seabuckthorn seed oil contains a high content of the two essential fatty acids, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid (Chen et al. 1990), which are precursors of other polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids.The oil from the pulp/peel of seabuckthorn berries is rich in palmitoleic acid and oleic acid (Chen et al. 1990). In the present study, we tested the effects of dietary supplementation with the two oils on the fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids, plasma neutral lipids and skin glycerophospholipids of atopic dermatitis patients.

Discussion The efficiency of incorporation and metabolism of dietary linoleic and α-linolenic acids strongly affects the essential fatty acid status of the human body.

In the present study, clear increases in the levels of α-linolenic acid and total n-3 fatty acids in plasma phospholipids and neutral lipids were already recognized after a one-month administration of seed oil.

The increase in the level of α-linolenic acid in plasma lipids showed a clear improving effect on atopic dermatitis symptoms (Yang et al. 1999a).

The high level of palmitoleic acid in pulp oil significantly increased the proportion of fatty acid in plasma lipids without a clear effect on the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids or improvement of atopic dermatitis symptoms (Yang et al. 1999a).

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About the Author: David Pascoe started the Rosacea Support Group in October 1998. .

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1 Reader Comment

  1. OrganicSkinCare says:

    Interesting article. It’s going to be fantastic to see a lot more research on Sea Buckthorn oil’s effects when used topically on rosacea skin conditions. Looking forward to reading a lot more on the subject.

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