Anti-inflammatory Herbs

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Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby Quiller » Sun Sep 02, 2007 2:22 am

Link

Matricaria recutita (German Chamomile): The dried flowers of this plant are commonly used for their sedative and spasmolytic properties. In addition, chamomile possesses anti-inflammatory activities. Matricaria contains several flavones [...] When applied topically, the flavonoids were found to penetrate intact skin deeply to exert an anti-inflammatory effect. Compared to a hydrocortisone 1% cream, the anti-inflammatory effect of a chamomile cream was weaker.

The recommended dose of Matricaria recutita flowers is 3 g three times daily; Matricaria is available as an infusion, a fluid extract, and a tincture (1:5).13 Allergic hypersensitivity to this herb may occur in rare cases, and the herb can irritate the eyes if applied near them.

Curcuma longa (Turmeric): Curcumin (the lipid-soluble component in turmeric) has been shown to exert an anti-inflammatory activity in several clinical studies, due in part to the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme15,17-20 and iNOS. [...] Curcumin has also been shown to have an effect on the release of inflammatory mediators (eg, eicosanoids), which may further explain its role as an anti -inflammatory agent.

[...] the recommended dose is 1.5 to 3 g of cut root daily; preparations of Curcuma longa are infusion powders, tinctures (1:5), and fluid extracts. The use of curcumin is contraindicated in bile duct obstruction because it enhances the secretion of bile.

Zingiber officinale (Ginger): Ginger is commonly used in the diet, especially in India. The main ingredients in ginger that have an anti-inflammatory effect as well as antitumor and antiproliferative pro perties against tumor cells are 6-gingerol and 6-paradol, which are found in the oleoresin fraction in ginger. Other constituents of ginger, 8-paradol and 8-shogaol, demonstrate a significant inhibitory effect on the COX-2 enzyme system. [...] Ginger oil obtained from the plant's roots was found to have a profound anti-inflammatory effect.

The German Commission E recommends a dose of 2 to 4 g of cut rhizome or dried extract daily or its equivalent. Because ginger can enhance bile secretion, it is contraindicated in patients with gallstones.

Glycyrrhiza glabra (Licorice): The roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra contain glycyrrhizin, a compound with anti-inflammatory activity. [...] Glycyrrhizic acid, another major constituent in licorice, also has anti-inflammatory activity. Glycyrrhizin, in addition to having anti-inflammatory actions, may act also as a chemoprotective agent against tumors.

The dose of licorice is 5 to 15 g daily of cut or powdered roots and should contain 200 to 600 mg of glycyrrhizin. Licorice use is contraindicated in patients with high blood pressure, cardiac diseases, or liver cirrhosis.

Salix alba (White Willow): The role of salicylates in inflammation and pain management is well documented in medicine. The bark of this plant contains salicin.

[...] A daily dose equivalent to 60 to 120 mg of salicin is recommended by the German Commission E. Willow use can trigger an allergic response in individuals sensitive to willow or to aspirin.

Arnica montana (Arnica): This herb is commonly used for treating bruises and swelling, although several clinical trials cast doubt on its efficacy. The presence of sesquiterpene lactones, such as helenalin and dihydrohelenalin, in arnica provides this herb with anti-inflammatory properties. [...] Helenalin, the most active lactone, exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of transcription factor NF-kB, which is responsible for the transcription of genes involved in encoding mediators for the inflammatory process. [...]

The recommended doses are 2 g of herb/100 mL for the aqueous infusion, one part herb and five parts fatty oil for the oil, and for the ointment, not more than 15% of oil. Sesquiterpene lactones may cause contact or allergic dermatitis when applied externally. The internal use of arnica is not recommended due to its toxicity on major organs such as the kidneys and the liver.

Other Herbs: A host of other herbs have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activities. The distillate of Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) has been known to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Echinacoside in Echinacea species (echinacea), a caffeoyl derivative, is thought to be responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity in these species. Ananas comosus (pineapple) contains bromelain, which has anti-inflammatory effects.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby David Pascoe » Sun Sep 02, 2007 5:19 am

A pretty good list ! Allow me to add some bits I've found too ;

Quiller wrote:Link

Glycyrrhiza glabra (Licorice): The roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra contain glycyrrhizin, a compound with anti-inflammatory activity. [...] Glycyrrhizic acid, another major constituent in licorice, also has anti-inflammatory activity. Glycyrrhizin, in addition to having anti-inflammatory actions, may act also as a chemoprotective agent against tumors.

The dose of licorice is 5 to 15 g daily of cut or powdered roots and should contain 200 to 600 mg of glycyrrhizin. Licorice use is contraindicated in patients with high blood pressure, cardiac diseases, or liver cirrhosis.


The Eucerin Redness Relief range of products is touted for its usage of Licochalcone A/Glycyrrhizic Acid. The general response to this range has been overall positive it seems.

I wonder if anyone has tried systemic glycycrrhizin ?

Quiller wrote:Arnica montana (Arnica): This herb is commonly used for treating bruises and swelling, although several clinical trials cast doubt on its efficacy. The presence of sesquiterpene lactones, such as helenalin and dihydrohelenalin, in arnica provides this herb with anti-inflammatory properties. [...] Helenalin, the most active lactone, exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of transcription factor NF-kB, which is responsible for the transcription of genes involved in encoding mediators for the inflammatory process. [...]

The recommended doses are 2 g of herb/100 mL for the aqueous infusion, one part herb and five parts fatty oil for the oil, and for the ointment, not more than 15% of oil. Sesquiterpene lactones may cause contact or allergic dermatitis when applied externally. The internal use of arnica is not recommended due to its toxicity on major organs such as the kidneys and the liver.


In the article "lavender, arnica, aloe vera, tea tree oil, and calendula ; do they work ?" I found some skepticism

Rosacea News wrote:Arnica

Arnica montana is a medicinal herb with a long history of use for treating swelling and bruising resulting from blows, and injuries such as sprains. Arnica flower is commonly available in both herbal and homeopathic preparations.


I can't find much good research for systemic herbs for rosacea - but it was good to see that tea tree oil may be be a reasonable treatment for ocular rosacea and/or ocular demodex.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby Quiller » Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:47 am

The only one I can endorse from personal use is calendula oil. It definitely works.

Ginger root I've take in capsules, but there were no explicit improvements. Maybe I should try the oil that the article mentions.

I've always meant to try Arubix S Anti Redness Cream, which contains German Chamomile, Licorice, and Arnica.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby David Pascoe » Tue Sep 04, 2007 5:31 am

Quiller wrote:The only one I can endorse from personal use is calendula oil. It definitely works.


Great to hear. I've never tried it, but it seems that it would be good if you are suffering from burning or a flareup. Calendula Oil is part of Dr. Soldo's anti flushing protocol that controls angiogenesis between IPL treatments. How do you use it ?

Quiller wrote:I've always meant to try Arubix S Anti Redness Cream, which contains German Chamomile, Licorice, and Arnica.


I think there is a lot of potential for this product, but we've heard so little about it in the online forums. It is a shame that it remains unknown because here is one product that ought to be considered `natural' - potentially a good example of how chemicals found in nature can be harnessed for topical products.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby Quiller » Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:02 am

David Pascoe wrote:How do you use it ?


I just slap it on in the evenings and go to bed. If I feel I've been sunburned at all, I apply it ASAP. I also use it before I put on sunscreen, because the sunscreen I use can sting and burn sometimes. The calendula eliminates this.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby David Pascoe » Thu Sep 06, 2007 4:20 am

As an interesting aside, a new PDL paper that I'm about to write about for Rosacea News is touting using Arnica pre- and post- laser treatment to help with purpura and swelling. So both arnica and calendula look like reasonable `natural' treatments.
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby Dan » Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:14 pm

Interesting. We have some info on Calendula in the RSRP:

RSRP: Calendula Extract

I'll have to see what I can find on Arnica and potentially add a page on it too...

Thanks David!
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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby Artist » Thu Sep 06, 2007 7:49 pm

Calendula is great. But, be careful since it tends to be allergenic. You may want to monitor your use closely and stop if you have or develop any dermatitis (allergic reaction on your skin) from it. If you don't react, or if you don't develop a reaction, you may be able to use it very successfully. Good luck!

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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby melissaw » Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:26 pm

Hi,
I'll second that.
Calendula gel causes me to break out in hives wherever I've applied it.
So sadly, no good for me but hopefully good for most.

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Re: Anti-inflammatory Herbs

Postby mimicocolulu » Fri Sep 14, 2007 9:40 am

I remember asking my derm about Arnica a few years ago. He cautioned me that if topical Arnica was used repeatedly in the same area for a prolonged period of time, irritation may occur. Lots of care needs to be taken with regards to the strength of the topical too because if the concoction is too strong, the area may become blistered, scarred and possibly show signs of permanent damage (eek!). And it should never be used on any open or raw wound.

Basically, he discouraged me. He was an average derm, nothing extraordinary so don't know for sure if he was on the ball with this. I do know that Arnica taken orally can be quite dangerous. And it goes without saying that pregnant women should never use topical Arnica. At the right strength though, it would be interesting to see if it actually did help with purpura. I think that further research would uncover some very favourable findings.

I have used Calendula gel though. Not on my facial rosacea but on bruising and swelling to other parts of my body. I find it extremely effective and can understand how others have had success treating their rosacea with it.

Personally, the best thing that I have ever used topically is a moisturiser that I make myself in small batches (to avoid the use of irritating preservatives). It includes Distilled Water, White Licorice, Green Tea, Caffeine and Hyaluronic Acid. Extremely soothing and simple.
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