red light therapy

LLLT can include light emitting diodes (LED), lamps and fluorescent tube devices. This form of therapy appears to help the inflammation of rosacea. LED is one example of a gentle form of light which can be used. There are also infra-red and near infra-red forms of light therapy being reported as effective. Drop by here to find out the latest about this emerging treatment area.

red light therapy

Postby CaroleJean » Wed Jun 18, 2008 3:16 pm

Hi, I'm considering trying red light therapy, but was wondering how exactly you use it! How long do you sit under it e.g.? Is it safe to use while you're on antibiotics (since some of them indicate increased sun sensitivity as a side effect)? I'm a bit confused about the different types of lamps and which would be best to try! I probably couldn't afford to spend a huge amount either...Any advice/suggestions would be appreciated! Oh an I live in the UK, anyone know of any suppliers here? Thanks! :)
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Re: red light therapy

Postby mysweetchester » Thu Jun 19, 2008 3:27 pm

My red light machine is being built now, so I don't know, but I'm sure many others will chime in here as many have had positive experiences with it!

mysweetchester (;)
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Re: red light therapy

Postby Aurelia » Sat Jun 21, 2008 1:53 pm

Hi CaroleJean,

How to use RLT depends on the particular lamp. There are now many different kinds of lamp and each manufacturer will supply a recommendation on how long to have it on, and the ideal distance from your face. So one person might use theirs for 10 minutes with the head of the lamp 6" from their face, while someone else might prefer to sit 12" away and start by using it for just a few minutes, building up to 10 minute blocks twice per day.

Basically, the more powerful the lamp, the shorter the standard treatment time. Some of the most powerful ones now incorporate infra-red (IR) or near infra-red (NIR) bulbs, and they are even stronger.

A major consideration is whether you buy a lamp that stands on a table or desk and you just sit with your face near it, or whether you buy a cheaper hand-held lamp to point at your face. People often find the latter annoying and stop using them because even though the lamp is small and light-weight, they find it tedious, especially if the head only covers a small area so you need to spend far more time shining it on one cheek for 10 minutes, then the other cheek for the same length of time, then ... well, you get the idea.

Some people get around that by lying on a bed with the lamp propped to shine on the right area. That prevents any cramping of the hand.

The most expensive lamps can treat the whole face at once. If that's what you want, the usual choice is between a double-headed lamp or a triple-headed one. If you are keen on DIY and electronics, a very clever rosacean pioneer of RLT kindly put together written instructions on how to build an RLT LED array (large area of lights) at home.

The medical advice I've seen says there's no clash with antibiotics because the possible increased sun sensitivity is to UV light, which isn't produced by LED lamps - or not as far as I'm aware.

Kind regards,

Aurelia

PS Hey, I just saw your photo. How adorable!
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Re: red light therapy

Postby CaroleJean » Sun Jun 22, 2008 12:30 pm

Thanks Aurelia :) (and for the comment about my photo :P )
Do you know if people get results just with red or if it's better to go for red plus infra-red? I'm confused with all the info out there!
I was also wondering where those instructions were about constructing your own unit? I'm no DIY/electronics expert but my husband might be (she said hopefully (rofl) )
Thanks for your support!
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Re: red light therapy

Postby Aurelia » Sun Jun 22, 2008 4:38 pm

Hi CaroleJean,

People are getting great results with the plain red LEDs and with the infra-red; however I know almost nothing about the latter so really wouldn't like to comment.

Artist could give you an excellent answer, when she bounces back to the board in a day or two. (rofl)

As for the DIY instructions, they were written by a wonderful young American named David C, who doesn't post here but was an early member of our email board, the Rosacea Support Group, and posts at the Rosacea Forum. I was just about to email him privately about something, so could forward him your email address, if you send it to me by PM.

Alternatively, perhaps Mysweetchester will share her copy with you. She seems a very friendly, sweet little thing. (hug)

Kind regards,

Aurelia
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Re: red light therapy

Postby Peter » Sun Jun 22, 2008 5:52 pm

Hello CaroleJean

I think Aurelia has answered your questions extremely well and I will add that many of us have written extensively about our experiences with red light, so it might be worth doing a search on the many posts that are on the rosacea sites. Ignore all of the scaremongering on the subject you might come across which was generated by one idiot and his followers, because this had nothing to do with RLT.

Back in 1998 I tried using red and blue light to treat my rosacea as I was desperate for something to help and also fed up the side effects from antibiotics. At the time I think I was the first person to try this form of treatment for their rosacea although the lamp I used then was initially developed for acne. Here is a link to the report I wrote in 2001 for the RSG.

http://rosacea.iinet.net.au/hl/m21152.html

I do have a LED hand held lamp (same as Aurelia's) here sitting in a cupboard gathering dust, which I will probably try and sell later but will loan to anybody who wants to experiment with RLT to see if it suits them. Lisa M was interested in it but I think was going wait until she was well on the way with the drug Clonidine first. Here is a picture of it anyway.

Image

A picture of the lamp I use.
Image


My nieces cat likes RLT as well (;)
Image

My advice would be to read as much as can on RLT and I am sure the others on here will try and help you as well by answering any questions. Please bear in mind though that rosacea is a very strange, unpredictable condition and there are never any guarantees that any treatment will work.

All the best.

Peter
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Re: red light therapy

Postby CaroleJean » Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:24 am

Thanks so much Aurelia and Peter :) Will do a bit more research on this. Sounds like it's helped a lot of people though which is encouraging as I'm feeling a bit hopeless about things at the mo.
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Re: red light therapy

Postby David Pascoe » Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:09 pm

Peter wrote:My nieces cat likes RLT as well (;)
Image


(rofl) (rofl) (rofl)

I like it !

Maybe my cat is getting some RLT via the electric blanket on my bed, as we speak (type ?)
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Re: red light therapy

Postby Peter » Mon Jun 23, 2008 9:53 pm

Hello David

The story behind that picture was that my brother in law was knocking a ceiling down at my nieces cottage and had left his inspection lamp in the other room. When he returned they found her cat sitting in front of the lamp because it was warm and as he had his camera he took the shot. They thought of my use of RLT and e mailed me the picture with the caption.

I suppose if we were all covered in fur then rosacea would not be a problem? Mmmm someone who will remain nameless on one of the Forums did send me a PM once accusing me of being a testosterone fuelled Neanderthal, so I suppose that's the nearest I'll ever get to being a hairy monster (giggle) . Mind you there are some who would take that as being a compliment but in my case it wasn't meant to be (thinking)

I'll have to dig out the picture I have somewhere where I had a beard and long hair for a bit of fun.

Grrrrrrrrrrrr

Peter

P.S. I didn't think it got that cold in Oz?
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Re: red light therapy

Postby CrabbyCathy » Tue Jun 24, 2008 6:04 am

Peter wrote:Mmmm someone who will remain nameless on one of the Forums did send me a PM once accusing me of being a testosterone fuelled Neanderthal, so I suppose that's the nearest I'll ever get to being a hairy monster (giggle) . Mind you there are some who would take that as being a compliment but in my case it wasn't meant to be (thinking)



Oh my goodness, are you kidding? I always wondered about how, on this forum, you can have "friends" or "foes". I think everyone on here is a "friend"; has anyone really had a "foe"?

Back to the subject :) I e-mailed (I'm big on e-mails rather than phone calls) http://www.acnelamp.com about the difference between all-red and red/near-infrared. They recommend all-red for rosacea, but I'm nosy and want to know a) why they sell red/near-infrared and b) what it's for.

Love the cat picture! I have two.
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