LLLT - an overview

LLLT can include light emitting diodes (LED), lamps and fluorescent tube devices. This form of therapy appears to help the inflammation of rosacea. LED is one example of a gentle form of light which can be used. There are also infra-red and near infra-red forms of light therapy being reported as effective. Drop by here to find out the latest about this emerging treatment area.

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby realdeal » Sat Sep 06, 2008 12:54 am

Has anyone actually tried the Omnilux Clear-U handheld red/blue LED unit for P&P rosacea? If so, did it ultimatley reduce the P&Ps?
Also, has anyone used another LLT handheld unit that worked well? Thanks! - Marty
realdeal
I'm new here
I'm new here
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 4:45 pm


Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby Twickle Purple » Mon Feb 16, 2009 2:49 am

Marty, the Tanda works very well (tanda.com) and has interchangeable red and blue heads.

A little bit of copy and paste with references for the intellectually curious:

Red Light Therapy (RLT) aka Low Level Light Therapy (LLLT)

Light therapy has been shown in over 40 years of independent research worldwide to deliver powerful therapeutic benefits to living tissues and organisms. Both visible red (400nm - 700nm) and invisible infrared light (700nm - 2000nm) have been shown to effect at least 24 different positive changes at a cellular level. Visible red light, at a wavelength of 660 nm (nanometers), penetrates living tissue to a depth of about 8-10 mm. It is very beneficial in treating problems close to the surface such as wounds, cuts, scars, trigger points, and acupuncture points and is particularly effective in treating infections. Infrared light penetrates to a depth of about 30-40 mm which makes it more effective for bones, joints, deep muscles, etc. Although both red and infrared wavelengths penetrate to different depths and affect tissues differently, their therapeutic effects are similar.

Wavelength dependent photobiochemical reactions occur throughout nature and are involved in such things as vision, photosynthesis, tanning and Vitamin D metabolism. In this view, infrared therapy is really a form of light therapy, and infrared light emitting diodes (LED's) and lasers are important in that they are convenient sources of intense light at wavelengths that stimulate specific physiological functions (Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 9:1-5, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, 1989). At this time, research has shown no side effects from this form of therapy other than an occassional increase in discomfort for a short period of time after treating chronic conditions. This occurs as the body reestablishes new equilibrium points following treatment. It is a phenomenon that may occur as part of the normal process of recovery.

LED's and Lasers are no more than convenient devices for producing light at specific wavelengths, and in addition to the one already cited, several other studies establish that it is the light itself at specific wavelengths that is therapeutic in nature and not the machine which produced it. All biological systems have a unique absorption spectrum which determines what wavelengths of radiation will be absorbed to produce a given therapeutic effect. The visible red and invisible infrared portions of the spectrum have been shown to have highly absorbent and unique therapeutic effects in living tissues.

The equation between the machine and the biological response is a common error often made by those who wish to promote the commercial interests of low-energy laser technology. Light radiation must be absorbed to produce a biological response. All biological systems have a unique absorption spectrum which determines what wavelengths of radiation will be absorbed to produce a given therapeutic effect. The visible red and infrared portions of the spectrum have been shown to have highly absorbent and unique therapeutic effects in living tissues.

Light Therapy Can:

1. Increase circulation by increasing the formation of new capillaries, which are additional blood vessels that replace damaged ones. New capillaries speed up the healing process by carrying more oxygen as well as more nutrients needed for healing and they can also carry more waste products away.

2. Stimulate the production of collagen. Collagen is the most common protein found in the body. Collagen is the essential protein used to repair damaged tissue and to replace old tissue. It is the substance that holds cells together and has a high degree of elasticity. By increasing collagen production less scar tissue is formed at the damaged site.

3. Increase RNA and DNA synthesis. This helps damaged cells to be replaced more promptly.

4. Stimulate fibroblastic activity which aids in the repair process. Fibroblasts are present in connective tissue and are capable of forming collagen fibers.

5. Stimulate tissue granulation and connective tissue projections, which are part of the healing process of wounds, ulcers or inflamed tissue.

6. Stimulate the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the major carrier of energy to all cells. Increases in ATP allow cells to accept nutrients faster and get rid of waste products faster by increasing the energy level in the cell. All food turns into ATP before it is utilized by the cells. ATP provides the chemical energy that drives the chemical reaction of the cell.

7. Increase lymphatic system activity. Edema, which is the swelling or natural splinting process of the body, has two basic components. The first is a liquid part which can be evacuated by the blood system and the second is comprised of the proteins which have to be evacuated by the lymphatic system. Research has shown that the lymph vessel diameter and the flow of the lymph system can be doubled with the use of light therapy. The venous diameter and the arterial diameters can also be increased. This means that both parts of edema (liquid and protein) can be evacuated at a much faster rate to relieve swelling.

8. Relieve pain. The photons of light energy enter the body as negative ions. This calls upon the body to send positive ions like calcium among others to go to the area being treated. These ions assist in firing the nerves thereby relieving pain. Light therapy is successfully used in pain therapy, dermatology and rheumatology with excellent therapeutic effects in the treatment of periarthritis and tendonitis.

9. Stimulate acetylcholine release and other parasympathetic effects.

10. Increase phagocytosis, which is the process of scavenging for and ingesting dead or degenerated cells by phagocyte cells for the purpose of clean up. This is an important part of the infection fighting process. Destruction of the infection and clean up must occur before the healing process can take place.


REFERENCES

The Effects of Low Energy Laser on Soft Tissue in Veterinary Medicine, LS McKibbin & R Downie; The Acupuncture Institute, Ontario Canada; J. Wiley & Sons

Macrophage Responsiveness to Light Therapy, S Young PhD, P Bolton BSc, U Dyson PhD, W Harvey PhD, & C Diamantopoulos BSc; London: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, 9; pp. 497-505 (1989)

The Photobiological Basis of Low Level Laser Radiation Therapy, Kendric C. Smith; Stanford University School of Medicine; Laser Therapy, Vol. 3, No. 1, Jan - Mar 1991

Low-Energy Laser Therapy: Controversies & Research Findings, Jeffrey R. Basford MD; Mayo Clinic; Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 9, pp. 1-5 (1989)

New Biological Phenomena Associated with Laser Radiation , M.I. Belkin & U. Schwartz; Tel-Aviv University; Health Physics, Vol. 56, No. 5, May 1989; pp. 687-690

Photobiology of Low-Power Laser Effects, Tina Karu PhD; Laser Technology Centre of Russia; Health Physics, Vol. 56, No. 5. May 89, pp. 691-704

A Review of Low Level Laser Therapy, S Kitchen MSCMCSP & C Partridge PhD; Centre for Physiotherapy Research, King's College London Physiotherapy, Vol. 77, No. 3, March 1991

Systemic Effects of Low-Power Laser Irradiation on the Peripherial & Central Nervous System, Cutaneous Wounds & Burns, S Rochkind MD, M Rousso MD, M Nissan PhD, M Villarreal MD, L Barr-Nea PhD. & DG Rees PhD, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, 9; pp. 174-182 (1989)

Use of Laser Light to Treat Certain Lesions in Standardbreds, L.S McKibbin DVM, & D Paraschak BSc., MA; Mod Veterinary Practice, March 1984, Sec. 3, p. 13

Low Level Laser Therapy: Current Clinical Practice In Northern Ireland, GD Baxter BSc, AJ Bet, MA,,JM AtienPhD, J Ravey PhD; Blamed Research Centre University Ulster Physiotherapy, Vol. 77, No. 3, March 1991

A Study of the Effects or Lasering of Chronic Bowed Tendons, Wheatley, LS McKibbin DVM, and DM Paraschak Bsc MA; Lasers in Surg & Medicine, Vol. pp. 55-59 (1983) Scc 3

Lasers and Wound Healing, Albert J. Nemeth, MD; Laser and Dermatology Center, Clearwater FL, Dermatologic Clinics, Vol.. 11 #4, 1993

Low Level Laser Therapy: A Practical Introduction, T. Ohshiro & RG Caiderhead, Wiley and Sons Low Reactive-Level Laser Therapy: A Practical Application, T. Ohshiro; Book: Wiley and Sons Laser Biostimulation of Healing Wounds: Specific Effects and Mechanisms of Action, Chukuka S Enwemeka, PhD; Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy - U. of Texas, Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX; The Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 9. No.10, 1988

Effect of Helium-Neon and Infrared Laser Irradiation on Wound Healing in Rabbits, B Braverman, PhD; R McCarthy. Pharmd, A Lyankovich, MD; D Forde, BS, M Overfield, BS and M Bapna, PhD; Rush- Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center; University of Illinois, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 9:50-58 (1989)

Bone Fracture Consolidates Faster With Low-Power Laser, MA Trelles, MD and E Mayayo, MD, Barcelona, Spain; Lasers in Surgery & Med. 7:36-45 (1987)

Wound Management with Whirlpool and Infrared Cold Laser Treatment, P Gogia; B Hurt and T Zim; AMI-Park Plaza Hospital, Houston TX, Physical Therapy, Vol. 68, No. 8, August 1988

Effects of Low-Level Energy Lasers on the Healing of Full-Thickness Skin Defects, J Surinchak. MA; M Alago, BS,, R Bellamy, MD; B Stuck, MS and M Belkin, MD; Lettennan Army Institute of Research. Presido of San Fransico, CA; Lasers in Surgery & Medicine, 2:267-274 (1983)

Biostimulation of Wound Healing by Lasers: Experimental Approaches in Animal Models and in Fibroblast Cultures, RP Abergel, MD; R Lyons, MD; J Castel, MS, R Dwyer. MD and i Uitlo. MD, PhD; Harbor UCLA Medical Center. CA: J Dennatol. Surgery Oncol., 13:2 Feb. 1987

Effects of Low Energy Laser on Wound Healing In a Porcine Model, J Hunter, MD; L Leonard, MD; R Wilsom MD; G Snider, MD and J DLxon, MD; Department of Surgery, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City UT, Lasers in Surgery & Med. 3:285-290, 84

Effect of Laser Rays on Wound Healing, E Mester, MD; T Spiry, MD; B Szende. MD and J Tola; Semmelweis Medical Univ. Budapes, The American Journal of Surgery. Vol 122, Oct 1971

Low Level Laser Therapy in the United Kingdom, Kevin C Moore, MD; The Royal Oldham Hospital, Oldhant, UK Effects of Skin-Contact Monochromatic Infrared Irradiation on Tendonitis, Capsulitis and Myofascial Pain, T.L Thomassoi DDS, 19th Annual Scientific Meeting, American Academy of Neurological & Orthopaedic Surgeons, Aug. 27-30, 1995 Facial Pain/TMJ Centre, Denver, CO.

Big hugs to you all!
Corinna
User avatar
Twickle Purple
Regular Helper
Regular Helper
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2007 5:38 am
Location: Vancouver Island, BC

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby Aurelia » Mon Feb 16, 2009 3:45 am

Welcome, Corinna!

We hope you are positively blooming. (flower) (flower) (flower) (flower) (flower) (flower)

Funnily enough, I've been dipping into the RLT posts lately and trying to make up my mind about whether or not to buy an RLT lamp that doesn't have to be held. Even with the wonderful guidance you have provided, it still looks dauntingly difficult to make up one's mind. Shall put it off for another few months until they have ones that make ice-cream at the same time.

With love,

Aurelia
User avatar
Aurelia
Rosacea Veteran
Rosacea Veteran
 
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:21 am

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby Lisamouries » Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:06 am

Shall put it off for another few months until they have ones that make ice-cream at the same time.


If you find one that can do that too, count me in! (rofl) (rofl) (rofl)
Lisa M.
User avatar
Lisamouries
Moderator Team
 
Posts: 1284
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:41 am
Location: London, UK

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby lookout14 » Mon Feb 16, 2009 1:57 pm

Hi everyone.....I have a local place by me that uses LED & Infared light to treat rosacea and hairloss and other inflammatory skin diseases.....I have no idea of the cost or anything but I wonder if their system is much better than mine.....I have a 4panel LED homemade one (DavidofIowa from the forum made for me) has about 700 LED's......I have been using mine since late Oct.2008 but I wonder if mine isn't as "powerful" so maybe that's why I haven't seen any changes in my skin's inflammation?

I may call them just for info about their units and of course price and how many tx's they recommend.....it seems like it would be impossible to treat rosacea this way....the cost and time and travel.....like you would need many yrs of tx so the cost would prohibit one from being able to use their system...but who knows I haven't called yet maybe it's not to bad?????? They do advertise it for hair loss and say after a few weeks of these treatments that the problem is fixed.....it's even be on the news locally too. Here's a link to the place tell me what you think.

http://hairandskincenter.com/index.html

Looks like hairdryers at the salon! I assume they have others for treating the skin......but the concept is the same as our homemade ones I think.
lookout14
Apprentice Member
Apprentice Member
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 5:24 pm

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby GJ* » Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:01 am

Red light is red light is red light.

The device at the salon is, ultimately, no better than yours. Save your money.

It is a great shame you have seen no improvements over four or five months. Sorry to hear it.
Does your rosacea usually get worse over the colder months? Is there a chance improvements have been masked or outrun by the deterioration (quite marked in my case) that comes with Winter?

Stick with it until the Spring, would be me advice. See how things go.
GJ*
Regular Helper
Regular Helper
 
Posts: 187
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:20 pm

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby lookout14 » Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:40 pm

Hi GJ,

I have been pondering this about my lack of response to my RLT.......I am thinking it could be due to the face that I was putting on lotion and then doing my treatments.....my skin is so dry, taunt & inflamed feeling that I can't stand not to put on lotion in the am and the pm right after cleansing.....so the last 2 sessions I forced myself to do them w/o putting on the lotion.....and after the 15mins or so when I get done and head in the bathroom to apply lotion my face feels dry like saw dust and taunt (I believe that's the inflammation part) but when I touch my skin it is very smooth which isn't what my sense's tell me....they tell me it's scaley and I need to exfoliate! But I even look closely in the mirror and touch again and NO it's smooth....with no flakey scale dead skin cells there.....it's so odd.....but maybe just maybe the lotion was blocking the light from getting into the skin deep enough to make a difference....so from here on out I will not put on the lotion and do this everyday about 20mins and see if I get a response.
lookout14
Apprentice Member
Apprentice Member
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 5:24 pm

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby yoli » Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:48 pm

I am so confusing and sorry for being confused, but what is the light good for redness or pimples?????
yoli
Star Member
Star Member
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:29 pm

Re: LLLT - an overview

Postby Aurelia » Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:12 am

yoli wrote:I am so confusing and sorry for being confused, but what is the light good for redness or pimples?????

My dear, there is no substitute for reading the articles. However, to simplify as much as possible, red light to fight redness and blue light to fight pimples.

Kind regards,

Aurelia
User avatar
Aurelia
Rosacea Veteran
Rosacea Veteran
 
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:21 am

Previous

Return to Low Level Light Therapy (LLLT)

cron