Yellow RLT

LLLT can include light emitting diodes (LED), lamps and fluorescent tube devices. This form of therapy appears to help the inflammation of rosacea. LED is one example of a gentle form of light which can be used. There are also infra-red and near infra-red forms of light therapy being reported as effective. Drop by here to find out the latest about this emerging treatment area.

Yellow RLT

Postby spencer » Mon Dec 13, 2010 2:16 am

Hi everyone, Just wondering if anyone has tried the yellow LEDs on their own. I'm thinking about purchasing an all yellow LED light instead of the red to help keep the flushing under control. I've read that the red can cause the formation of new blood vessels. Does anyone know whether this is true?

Thanks!
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Re: Yellow RLT

Postby Aurelia » Mon Dec 13, 2010 1:45 pm

Hi Spencer,

spencer wrote:Hi everyone, Just wondering if anyone has tried the yellow LEDs on their own. I'm thinking about purchasing an all yellow LED light instead of the red to help keep the flushing under control.

We don't often hear about the use of other coloured LEDs for rosacea, since most people use red or not at all. If it helps any, here are just the relevant quotes from the interview Dr David Goldberg kindly provided for our Resource Pages section four years ago. (He is a dermatology professor and director of laser research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, and one of the world's undoubted experts on the subject.)

Specifically regarding YELLOW LED treatments:

"The evidence seems to suggest the vessels get smaller after treatment. The beauty of all LED is how safe they are. They can be used in all skin types."

"We generally provide a series of 5-7 LED treatments. They are given 2-4 weeks apart. Yellow LED treatments take only seconds ... Home units generally are not powerful enough to lead to same results as medical quality units. Also the danger in home units is the lack of appropriate eye protection especially for deeper penetrating red/near infrared LED."

"Flushing, burning, and swelling are ideally treated with either yellow or red LED, generally in combination with IPL (or laser) treatments. The effect of IPL and LED appears to be additive."

"Inflammation or swelling is best treated with a combination of IPL and yellow/red LED."

"Basic rule is yellow LED for mild redness, red LED for more inflamed rosacea, combination of red and near-infrared for inflammation and swelling."


In his experience, yellow LED doesn't help against seb derm.

http://rosacea-research.org/wiki/index. ... berg%2C_MD

spencer wrote:I've read that the red can cause the formation of new blood vessels. Does anyone know whether this is true?

The most interesting explanation I've seen on that topic is that RLT can cause the formation of new blood vessels, but they are healthy vessels that take over the work of the older, damaged blood vessels, hence so many (but not all) rosaceans reporting an improvement in their condition.

Kind regards,

Aurelia
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Re: Yellow RLT

Postby spencer » Mon Dec 13, 2010 6:07 pm

Hi Aurelia, Thanks so much for getting back to me! What Dr. Goldberg says is really interesting. I am considering getting a unit from the LED man with a mix of the yellow and red lights (no infrared). I have mild redness with moderate flushing, so I think the red and yellow should be a nice combo. I was considering getting all yellow, but am concerned I'd be wasting my money. Do you know if there is any risk of longterm side effects with LED therapy? I've read some horror stories on the Internet, but maybe I shouldn't believe everything I read. (;)
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Re: Yellow RLT

Postby spencer » Sun Dec 19, 2010 3:37 am

Hi, Just wondering if anyone has ever used the red and yellow LED lights mixed together? I have mild redness with moderate flushing (most of the time!) and think this would make a nice combo. The only other question I have is whether the yellow and red should be used for a different amount of time, respectively, and therefore separately.
Thanks.
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Re: Yellow RLT

Postby Aurelia » Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:34 pm

Hi Spencer,

spencer wrote:Do you know if there is any risk of longterm side effects with LED therapy? I've read some horror stories on the Internet, but maybe I shouldn't believe everything I read. (;)

There have been some truly insane claims about burns from RLT, which resulted in the classic riposte about it being "like getting a paper cut from a balloon". The whole point about LED lights is that they are non-thermal, meaning that they do not generate heat, or else so little that there is no possibility of it damaging tissue. However, although the earlier LED lamps were so weak they took months to produce any noticeable effect, the modern lamps are stronger so may generate a small amount of heat that might trigger a small increase in transient facial flushing if the lamp is placed too close to the skin, and especially if the person is sensitive to heat. Obviously, anyone who has light sensitivity should steer clear of light therapy.

Some of the latest lamps use infrared or near-infrared LEDs, which are very different from the original bulbs. IR and NIR light goes further into the skin and can generate heat, so although there are many satisfied users around, I feel quite wary, not least through knowing little about the technology. As with everything else, my recommendation is to read extensively, seek advice from a registered physician or derm, then start off very gradually, using eye protection with something like IR or NIR.

To go back to the plain old LEDs, there have been some genuine but low-key complaints about them, I think generally from people who either didn't respond or who experienced an initial increase in flushing. From what I've read, that was usually at a low level and some later reported good results so attributed it to being a natural part of the healing process when new, healthier vessels were being created to take over the work of defective blood vessels. However, in such circumstances, I suspect that dissatisfied users generally just give up, as usually happens when an unexpected and unwelcome side effect is experienced with any kind of treatment, including topicals or meds.

Everyone has a right to their own opinions, and I think you know that I am fully in favour of adopting a cautious approach in health matters. Yet I have no problem at all in trusting the judgement of the experts who seem to be unanimous in stating that simple red and yellow LEDs (excluding the IR and NIR) are harmless, as in Dr Goldberg's stance that "The beauty of all LED is how safe they are." BTW Dr Goldberg is not only an eminent dermatologist and clinical professor and director of Laser Research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in NY; author of 136 articles in peer-reviewed medical journals and numerous books; and a current or former member of a large number of committees advising the AAD and other specialist bodies; he also has a doctorate in legal studies and is an Adjunct Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law in NY. I would just love to see anyone try to tarnish his reputation for supporting RLT.

Regarding your question about whether yellow and red LEDs "should be used for a different amount of time, respectively, and therefore separately", I only know that people generally say that yellow light works far more quickly, although that might be because few people buy yellow lamps for home use so mainly only see it in medical practices, university clinics, etc., where the large, professional machines have massed banks of bulbs. For example, in the RSRP interview, Dr Goldberg said of the machine in his clinic, "Yellow LED treatments take only seconds", and last year we spotted an article about clinics that said a single, standard treatment session with the massed bank of GentleWaves amber lights took "less than one minute".

http://www.consultingroom.com/News/Disp ... s%20LEDs?#

How one would compare the professional machines to the tiny lamps people use at home is beyond me, but I hope some of the above might prove helpful to you.

Kind regards,

Aurelia
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Re: Yellow RLT

Postby spencer » Wed Dec 29, 2010 8:45 pm

Hi Aurelia, Thanks for all of the amazing information. I feel confident in selecting an all LED light with red and yellow lights that can be used separately. As has been recommended, I will start off slowly. I'm not expecting miraculous results, but it would be great to have another tool in my toolbox. By the way, the flushing is much better these days. I think it's because I've incorporated 3000 mg evening primrose oil into my daily routine for the last month. It could already be helping with the low estrogen. I am so happy not to have that burning, stinging, throbbing sensation. Now, if only the hormones would remain balanced all month! I guess I'll take what I can get.

Thanks again for all of your help and Happy Holidays! :)
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