Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

What is the difference between blushing and flushing, how is that related to my rosacea and how do I treat it ? Stop in here for all your answers.

Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Aurelia » Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:01 pm

Hi Colin,

When someone comes to a rosacea forum from a firm that produces medicines and says they're working on products that will help treat our condition, including products (presumably topicals) that will be on sale soon, but the firm will "most probably never release a topical medication for rosacea", I honestly think most people would struggle to understand it.

I don't have a doctorate, but I do have 4 other university qualifications, so am not dim. However, there's obviously no point in even attempting to discuss this any further so I shall leave it there.

Thanks for the offer of advice on rosacea, but I am pretty happy with the rosacea advice my dermatologist provides.

Kind regards,

Aurelia

PS Best of luck with your product line.
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Artist » Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:44 pm

I was thinking they would be supplement combinations, but that's just a guess. I'll be curious to know, in any case. -Artist
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby AustralianSciences » Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:54 pm

Dear Artist,

I have to commend you on making a great effort to reduce skin irritation.
Your efforts to cleanse and moisturize but not irritate, do come with rewards (in the form of less skin cell activity).
I use any non-perfumed soap. It is possible that a soap/cleanser could irritate, but unlike a moisturizing cream that stays on for most of the day, the soap/cleanser goes on and off quickly. The level of skin irritation from irritating substances does relate to the amount of time they are in contact with the skin.

Dear Sarah,

I will try to answer you, and a previous message by eric, about my thoughts on neuropeptides/neurotransmitters with the following.
Australian Sciences has done tests to block individual neuropeptides (Substance P, CGRP, VIP, etc) to see what effect that has on reducing flushing.
We saw that Substance P and CGRP greatly contribute to the burning sensation and delayed sensitivity. We've even done a lot of other non-neuropeptide tests, blocking Nitric Oxide and Nitric Oxide Synthase, etc. These tests were good to get a greater biological understanding of rosacea and flushing (and how the body works). However, a few years ago I felt (and still do) that this kind of approach is attractive to a pharmaceutical company but not to someone who wants to reverse rosacea. There are many neuropeptides to stop, and many other kinds of inflammatory chemicals to stop - you can't block them all, especially when you are producing more because of your excessive skin infrastructure.
So we began to look into methods that could reverse the excessive blood vessel and nerve infrastructures, which contribute to the release of inflammatory chemicals in the skin. We tested about about two hundred growth factor inhibitors or anti-inflammatory compounds to see how well they worked against various stimuli, and did get some very good results. We also looked into blood vessel removal via IPL and further with flush minimization and reducing skin cell activity using the bodies own systems (such as heat regulation, neuropeptide storage/depletion and trigger avoidance). So I favor approaches that reduce skin infrastructure and skin activity (without specifically focusing on neuropeptide blocking drugs).

I am not overly familiar with ND:Yag, I am with UV lights. But will have to talk about them next time.

Best regards,
Colin Dahl
Australian Sciences
http://www.ausci.com

Please note that this information is not intended to represent medical advice.
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Twickle Purple » Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:19 pm

melissawohl wrote:My husband wears a ski hat to bed sometimes LOL because of me and my fondness for cool temps. But I am trying to keep everything closer to room temp now thanks to Colin and the information he so kindly shared with us. But I still like it cool when I sleep. I was always like this even before rosacea. I love fresh cool air at night and it is best for a good night's sleep IMO.


Hi Melissa,

I sleep with icepacks about half the time. I drop them into soft pillow cases and roll the cases over and over til only a gentle steady coolness is emitted. I put one on top of my head, which feels very nice, and one resting on each shoulder which cools my neck and sometimes I will lie on them if my cheeks are hot. Some nights I have one at my feet too. I am surprised to find myself doing this because I am always cold! Yet, it does not affect my ability to be warm, in fact it greatly enhances my comfort. I can find the small reusable ice packs at most pharmacies. You may want to give this a shot sometime and see if dear Greg can go capless. :D
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby phlika29 » Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:48 pm

AustralianSciences wrote:
But your questions seem to be more like ones I would get from shareholders (and this is a rosacea forum).

Best regards,
Colin Dahl
Australian Sciences
http://www.ausci.com

Please note that this information is not intended to represent medical advice.


Hope nobody minds but I just wanted to point out that everything Aurelia does is for the benefit of other rosacea suffers. She has the sort of sharp and enquiring mind that is greatly appreciated. She is always looking out for members and asks the sort of questions that enable informed decisions to be made.

cheers
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Artist » Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:57 pm

Colin, Thanks! I agree about application. I've come to prefer using non-irritating masks once in a while. For example, sea kelp bioferment with licorice powder worn as a mask for a quick anti-inflammatory treatment.

This discussion got me thinking about horse chestnut, which is considered to be anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. I've seen it used in topical formulations for rosacea, but you think the oral form would be effective? It has been proven effective for chronic venous insufficiency.

Here is a tincture that is sold, and they even mention rosacea near the top:
http://www.mangosmarket.com/shop/produc ... _product=0

Cheers!

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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Twickle Purple » Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:05 pm

I am always impressed with the specificity in which members of this board discuss new products. My ability to make sound decisions is due, in great part, to their level of inquiry. I am very thankful to the folks that make up this board. There are a lot of products out there, I need to trust the folks that are in the same boat I'm in and be able to question someone who's end game is sales. I mean no disrespect here, I just want the mindset understood.
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Artist » Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:41 pm

Colin: Some background that may help: We have a long history dealing with genuine, and not so genuine contributors. So, pretty much everyone here was probably skeptical until those tough questions were asked. This is a board full of wonderful people, and Aurelia has our very best interest at heart, as I'm sure you understand. It is because Aurelia asked these tough questions that I feel totally comfortable continuing these discussions, so I hope no offense was taken. After many years at this, we find that we naturally do best when all possible conflicts of interest are known...when everything is out on the table. Thanks to you both!!! (clapping) -Artist
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Re: Warm Room Flush: PDF released from Australian Sciences

Postby Quiller » Thu Mar 13, 2008 7:19 pm

Suggestion: in the next booklet, include references. I was very curious about your information, but couldn't see how to follow it up.
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I can “feel” my skin – you say excessive skin activity other

Postby pennya » Sat Apr 19, 2008 7:07 pm

Hi Colin

Colin, one symptom that I have been experiencing for a few months now is the feeling that my skin (mostly on my cheeks) is literally crawling with something or like a tingling sensation. Often that’s where my flushes will start. My main trigger is heat/warm temperatures. …blood will start flowing to that tingling area and unless I put some cold compresses on it quickly, it will turn to a full flush eventually.

One of the things I have read is that the crawling sensation may caused by mites and it should be treated as a demodex problem. I was never really convinced of that. To me it always felt like a problem with the skin just being more sensitive, in my case extremely sensitive.

After reading your booklet that’s where my suspicions became confirmed, I think: excessive skin activity. Could you please enlighten me with regards to these questions:

1.Is the tingling sensation the result of my excessive skin activity?
2.What exactly do you mean by skin activity – is it the sensitized sensory nerves or is it the excessive number of nerves and blood vessels…or are they interchangeable?

“A major problem involved with the continual activation of sensory nerves is hyper-sensitization. As rosacea progresses through regular flushing, nerves not only undergo axonogenesis but they can become sensitized.(qoute from your booklet) >>> Is this the cause for the tingling?

Colin, I would really like to thank you for taking your personal time and helping me and others who have to deal with this condition.
Hope to hear from you soon!
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