Atralin Gel (Tretinoin 0.05%) being trialled for the redness of Rosacea

Written by on May 20, 2010 in clinical trials with 6 Comments

atralin-gel

The Clinical Trials Register is listing a new trial today for a topical retinoid, Atralin Gel 0.05% for the treatment of the redness and broken blood vessels of rosacea. Officially the trial will look at the redness, telangiectasia, facial edema, and dry skin of around 80 rosacea sufferers over a period of up to 46 weeks. Additionally the evaluation of flushing, burning, stinging, and topical product intolerance will be incorporated into the trial.

Atralin Gel is a topical retinoid indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The trial description specifically mentions that the gel will be applied 3 times per week and only if no irritation is seen will the participant be instructed to increase the frequency of use to once per day.

The trial collaborator is Valeant Pharmaceuticals, who distribute Finacea in the US on behalf of Intendis. Valeant also makes the Kinerase, CeraVe and Dermaveen range of products.

Atralin Gel for the Treatment of Rosacea

Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea is a type of rosacea that causes a red face often with frequent flushing, topical sensitivity and prominent blood vessels. We think that long term damage to skin from the sun (photodamage) may play a role in causing this type of rosacea. Tretinoin is a topical medication that is known to improve photodamage. We want to find out if Atralin (tretinoin 0.05%) Gel used for up to 46 weeks will improve erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR).

The trial lists the following papers as being relevant to the use of topical retinoids for rosacea;

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About the Author

About the Author: David Pascoe started the Rosacea Support Group in October 1998. .

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6 Reader Comments

  1. Doug says:

    Its always good to see new trials!

  2. Trent says:

    Retin-A?

    If so, this will cause more problems for almost everyone. Why are they trying this?

  3. David Pascoe says:

    It does seem that not everyone will be able to benefit from Atralin but it is encouraging to see it being officially trialled for the redness of rosacea. There is a lack of treatments for the red face of rosacea.

    Doctors will likely only suggest retinoids if they appear on the officially approved list. Also if good information about the likely adverse reactions is available that will also help doctors and patients decide if this is right for them.

    davidp.

  4. MILLICENT says:

    IT’S A PRIOR AUTHORIZATION THRU MY INSURANCE & I HAVE A CARD THAT GIVES IT TO ME FOR $25.00 BUT MY INSURANCE IS GIVING ME A HARD TIME. WHAT MAKES THIS BETTER THAN RETIN-A?

  5. David Pascoe says:

    Hi Millicent,

    The point of the trial is to hopefully prove whether it works for rosacea or not.

    Given that Retin-A is available in strengths of 0.04% and 0.1% one could assume that Retin-A 0.04% and Atralin 0.05% would offer similar benefits and have a similar reaction profile.

    davidp.

  6. Doug says:

    Any results from this trial yet?

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