AAD: How to Wash Your Face

The American Academy of Dermatology has published some face-washing tips.

Washing your face may seem like such a simple activity that highlighting it may feel unnecessary.

For rosacea sufferers though, we know that a gentle skin care regime is important.

Starting your rosacea-beating regime with an irritating cleanse is simply going to make your skin much harder to manage.

What did the AAD recommend ? read on for more information.

Face-Washing Tips for Healthier-Looking Skin

SCHAUMBURG, Ill. (Nov. 13, 2012) – Washing your face is as simple as using soap and water, right? Not quite say dermatologists. How you wash your face can make a difference in your appearance.

For healthier-looking skin, Dr. Rohrer recommends people follow these tips to keep their face looking healthy:

  1. Use a gentle, non-abrasive cleanser that does not contain alcohol.
  2. Wet your face with lukewarm water and use your fingertips to apply cleanser. Using a washcloth, mesh sponge or anything other than your fingertips can irritate your skin.
  3. Resist the temptation to scrub your skin as scrubbing irritates the skin.
  4. Rinse with lukewarm water, and pat dry with a soft towel.
  5. Apply moisturizer if your skin is dry or itchy. Be gentle when applying any cream around your eyes so you do not pull too hard on this delicate skin.
  6. Limit washing to twice a day and after sweating.Wash your face once in the morning and once at night as well as after sweating heavily. Perspiration, especially when wearing a hat or helmet, irritates the skin. Wash your skin as soon as possible after sweating.

The list may at first appear obvious, but perhaps there are some subtle things in here that you may have missed;

How often do you wash your face?

There isn’t any exclusion described for extra oily skin. I wonder if you find this useful advice – only sweating is listed as being irritating enough to require immediate removal.

Lukewarm Water and Fingertips

Is the temptation to use a washcloth too strong for you to resist? Rosacea skin can be easily irritated, but what about that extra sticky makeup or sunscreen?

Always use a Moisturizer

Again this hint may at first appear obvious, but it was a good find for me, especially as a male. Does anyone think that they can get away without a moisturizer ?

I would add to this list, especially coming from a climate with many hours or strong sunlight each day that rosacea sufferers should always use a sunscreen.

This List Too Simple?

I’m sure many rosacea sufferers will look at this list and feel it is too simplistic. Maybe that is the point though – keep your daily skincare regime simple.

Related Articles

About the Author

About the Author: David Pascoe started the Rosacea Support Group in October 1998. .

Get More Info

Subscribe now to receive the latest information about rosacea in your inbox.

Join more than 9521 other readers and stay in touch with Rosacea Support

Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Pinterest Connect on Google Plus

5 Reader Comments

  1. Gillian says:

    Oops lost the first one!! Have just started using a new product Cliniderm Gentle cleanser that seems to be doing a better job than Cetaphil particularly around the nose and removing makeup.So far so good. I use baby washcloths the soft side rather than my fingers. As they are inexpensive and a handy size I use a clean one every day, just make sure they are rinsed free of laundry soap.
    The beautician at the drug store gave me samples of Cliniderm’s RosaCalm to try and it seems to be fairly good, Its tinted green and a bit gloppy but gentle. I shall buy some as soon as the stock arrives.
    One more comment if I may. Someone at some time, a man I think, mentioned Rimmel London Lasting Finish, 25 hour foundation. Thanks for the tip it is great stuff very inexpensive so one can experiment to find the best shade (s).

  2. KRC says:

    I have found that reactions are not always to a moisturiser, although obviously they can be, but rather to how it is applied. Being new to this game,there were products I thought were making me red when in fact it was the pressure of my finger tips in applying. I tried reapplying the offending moisturiser by gently patting w. a cotton ball and had no reaction. I use Cerave or jojoba oil. No real science as to when I use what, but I apply them after using metro creme unless I am using a sunscreen. The application process is important! The point is well taken.

  3. KRC says:

    Also, I try to wait a half hour between applications of metro creme and moisturiser!

  4. djcarpitella says:

    As the wife of someone just Dx with Rosacea (his face was turning terribly red- more than usual- and burning him so badly he couldn’t concentrate at work!)- I’ve been searching the internet for dietary, lifestyle and facial cleansing strategies to heal his face.
    You bring up some very good (and pertinent to what I was exactly searching for’) questions after the list of how to clean your face, but unfortunately you didn’t answer your own questions! :/ Most importantly to my husband- how to clean oil (T-zone) skin that also is affected by Rosacea. He used to use a harsh washcloth- and now any cloth irritates and hurts his skin, but on the other hand he feels his pores aren’t being opened/cleaned well enough and will break out from the oil building up.
    How do you deal with this? Are there any cloths made to aid in cleansing for those with sensitive skin and/or Rosacea?
    Thank you anyone for any help in advance! :)

Leave a Comment

Top